Cover Letter For Internal Application Examples

Application for internal job positions

Just because you are an internal candidate for a new job in your company doesn't mean you're a shoo-in.

Working within a large organization provides many advantages. One of the pros is that internal job opportunities arise from time to time, so employees don't even have to leave the building to advance their careers.

But it's easy to trip up when applying for an internal job. Why? One of the main problems is that many employees approach internal job offerings too casually. It's important to remember that similar rules and standards are in place when applying for any job, whether inside or outside a company.

Applying from within doesn't always necessarily give you an "in." The bottom line is you're trying to get a new job, and you need to use every professional tactic you can to get it. Follow these tips to help you get in from the inside.

Don't apply for every available position

You'll never be taken seriously if you apply each time a position opens. Clarify your reasons for applying for a specific job. If the opportunity is in a department in which you wish your career to grow, or if the position will allow you to expand your knowledge in a particular area, make it known.

Update your resume

Many internal candidates don't update their resumes, assuming that it's all in the family and the new internal position is merely an extension of their current one. Make sure your resume includes all the achievements you've earned since joining the organization.

Write a customized cover letter

What if you've done work for the manager who needs a new assistant, and he already knows you're terrific? There are still things the manager doesn't know about you. A cover letter should begin, "I appreciate the opportunity to apply for the XYZ position. Let me tell you why I am a good fit for the job."

Sound a bit formal? That's the idea. No matter how often you've talked to the person you're applying to, or how well he may know you, you want to use the application process as an opportunity to show how professional you are. It's quite possible the new potential boss only sees you as Sally, and not as Sally the super assistant, because he doesn't know about your specialized training, the education you're currently pursuing or your past work experience. When writing a cover letter for an internal position, be sure to expand on what makes you such a natural fit for the position: You're already familiar with the company's culture, there would be less onboarding time needed for things like orientation and paperwork, you would adhere to the same high standards that are currently expected of you, you would welcome the opportunity to build upon your success and continue your career at the company, et cetera. At the same time, you want to highlight the skills that would make you a valuable addition to that person's team—just as you would in a resume for an outside company. 

Let your current boss know you're applying for the job

While you may not want your current boss to know you're seeking a new opportunity in the company, he will find out quickly if you become a candidate. Bosses don't like to be in the dark about what their employees are up to, so don't keep them there. Be honest about your reasons for applying for another position, and see if he would be willing to put in a good word for you.

Construct an internal support system

If you don't know the manager you're hoping to work for, get other people you know in common to promote you.

Write a thank-you letter after the interview

Remember it's still a job interview, and all the regular courtesies apply, including sending an interview thank-you letter.

Didn't get the job?

Now is a good time to find out why. Try to get some feedback from HR. Turn the rejection into an opportunity by getting whatever skills you need so that the next time you apply for a similar job, you'll be the winning candidate.

In the meantime, you should look for jobs outside of your current company. you can start by joining Monster today. As a member, you can get upload your resume, so recruiters, searching our database every day, can find good job candidates just like you.


Writing a cover letter might seem like a waste of time if you’re applying for an internal position, but assuming that another department manager appreciates your skills and contributions to the company is a mistake. Even if the department manager knows you, she may be unaware of the extent of your previous experience, knowledge and special areas of expertise.

Introduce Yourself

A well-written cover letter serves as an introduction. It not only summarizes your qualifications, but also details the personal qualities that make you a good choice to fill the position. The cover letter presents the most pertinent facts about you in the best possible light. When you take the time to write a cover letter, you let the hiring manager know that you take the internal job application process seriously. A good cover letter serves as an enticement to read your resume, which should be updated to include your current skills and level of experience.

Example:

I enthusiastically submit my application for the Accounting supervisor position. Working at this corporation for the past five years has given me many opportunities for using my training and skills as a certified public accountant and graduate of Carlson School of Business.

Summarize Relevant Experience

Your cover letter allows you to highlight your experience with your current company and with previous employers. Chances are even if you are well-known in your current company, a manager won’t necessarily know every detail about what you do during the day. Other departments may only see the results of the work you do and might not understand the skills and expertise required to carry out the work. The hiring manager also won’t know about your previous experience. If you performed several tasks relevant to the open position in another job, it’s important to mention this, rather than risk the manager dismissing your application as lacking sufficient experience.

Example:

My current job duties include cost accounting and internal auditing. I am known for my honesty and integrity. Previously, I worked at an accounting firm in Baltimore where I also managed the office and supervised five accounting clerks.

Mention Special Qualifications

Use the cover letter to briefly explain any special qualifications that make you a good candidate for the job. Any special skills and qualifications that are specific to your company can give you an edge over outside candidates. It’s important to note if you have accreditation, certification or training in your field. If you have a good working relationship with the manager’s department, detailing your experience working on joint projects will emphasize how much you already know about the department’s role in the company.

Example:

I am seeking this promotional opportunity because I have many solid relationships within the company and a demonstrated track record of being a team player. Compiling the J.D. Gurney report is just one example of how I worked collaboratively with other departments to meet a pressing deadline.

Promote Company Ties

You have one asset that other applicants for the position don’t: your proven relationship with your company. You’ve already demonstrated that you are a reliable, loyal employee. End your letter by explaining why you like working for the company and what give you a competitive edge.

Example:

If offered the position, I can start immediately and quickly get to work in the new job with minimal orientation, or training in company policies, which I already understand and follow.

About the Author

Working at a humane society allowed Jill Leviticus to combine her business management experience with her love of animals. Leviticus has a journalism degree from Lock Haven University, has written for Nonprofit Management Report, Volunteer Management Report and Healthy Pet, and has worked in the healthcare field.

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